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The Skids No Bad Words 1977-2017 by Richard Jobson

Posted on April 27, 2018 at 8:35 PM Comments comments (0)

No Bad Words includes all The Skids lyrics written by Richard Jobson with commentaries on selected songs from the first four albums and the whole of Burning Cities.


Hardback Edition

Limited edition, hand-numbered hardback signed by Richard Jobson

200 copies only, available direct from Bracketpress

152mm x 105mm, 192 pages, litho printed, Munken Premium Cream 90gsm, sewn binding, printed endpapers, ribbon marker, foil-blocked cover + full-colour dust jacket

£15 + P&P


Paperback Edition

152mm x 105mm, 192 pages, litho printed, Munken Premium Cream 90gsm, sewn binding, 8-page gatefold cover on Munken Rough 300gsm

£10 + P&P

Pre-order direct from www.bracketpress.co.uk


Books begin shipping 13th May, ahead of publication on the 19th.


Richard Jobson and The Skids Exhibition

Posted on April 27, 2018 at 7:25 PM Comments comments (0)


Get Ready Dunfermline. Richard Jobson and The Skids Exhibition opens today at the stunning Dunfermline Carnegie Library & Galleries.


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A Special homecoming for The Skids

Posted on April 21, 2018 at 3:05 AM Comments comments (0)



By Paul McCabe


To paraphrase the title of one of their own classic singles – The Skids Are Coming.


The legendary Fife band are riding the crest of a wave with the success of a string of raucous gigs and brand new album ‘Burning Cities’ which not only received uniformly excellent reviews but also made the UK top 30.


Delighting long term fans, like fellow Fifer Ian Rankin, and gathering new ones, they got a thumbs up on Iggy Pop’s 6Music show. The revived interest in the reformed group has led to a major exhibition plus a convention weekend in Dunfermline where they originated.


The exhibition takes place in the town’s Carnegie Library and Galleries and the band’s frontman Richard Jobson said it is a building he knows only too well.


“For a long period of my life it was a second home,” he admitted, “I’ve got a really deep affection for the place.


“I went there straight after school most days of the week and at the weekend I would hang out there too.


“It was a place which had an immense collection of books which was available to me for free, and it was a place where I could get on and do my own thing quietly.


“I used to quite like sitting there with all the old guys who were in there for the warmth. They were amazing characters.


“Without the Carnegie Library I certainly wouldn’t have had the courage to write a lot of the genesis of what would become Skids songs.”


Jobson says he was approached with the idea by Fife Cultural Trust and he saw it as a chance to rewrite a historical wrong. “There’s been so many polls done in Scotland over the years about the best 50 bands or whatever and Skids have been completely erased from history almost.


“I’m not bitter, it’s just the way it is, but I was watching a documentary about Scottish music which said punk started with Orange Juice and Postcard Records, which is just insane, this rewriting of history.


“So it was put to me about celebrating this remarkable thing that happened – which didn’t happen in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen or Dundee, it happened in Dunfermline.


“The Skids recruited members from Fife mining communities. From Lochgelly, Ballingry, Cowdenbeath and Crossgates. It was a different mindset we had and I think that was one of the reasons that we were much more individualistic.


“We had that idiosyncratic sound through Stuart Adamson of course, which moved us away from city bands.


“City bands are so embroiled in trying to look cool. We never tried to be cool because it didn’t matter to us. What was relevant to us was us, the music and the people we were talking to about our music, and they were essentially working class people.


“We didn’t have that art school, more moulded sense of who we were, so I think we’ve just slipped of the radar.


For the record, the band, with the late Stuart Adamson who would go on to have huge success in Big Country, had five top 40 singles and four top 30 albums in just four years. None too shabby.


Jobson said: “The Skids squeezed a lot of music out and a lot of content but we didn’t last that long. So a lot of those kids then, who are adults now, maybe never go the chance to see us.


“It was a very hectic period full of life, energy, zest, ambition and creativity but a very short period. In those days you stuck out two albums a year.”


And now the band have been gigging heavily, with shows already lined up for 2019, giving them a chance to reconnect with their audience and Jobson describes it as “wonderful”


“We decided that when we were going to do it we would just go for it and leave our sense of the ridiculousness at the door. In many ways it is ridiculous at our age to be going out and playing gigs.


“We just went out and did it for the sense of adventure and that word which has disappeared from music – fun.


“For me personally the thing that I love most is interaction with people because I liked doing that when I was first in the Skids. The conversation you have with the audience, I really love that part of it.


“The age our audience is now, they all have a story to tell. It might not always be a story of success, it could be tragic and tough, but they do have a story to tell and that’s been really heartwarming.


“People stick with you. They become your friends. We might be the first record they ever bought like ‘Into The Valley’ or ‘Masquerade’ when they were 12 years old. That’s then same for me when I bought my first record which was The Sensational Alex Harvey Band.


“That becomes your band because you take ownership of them.”


As well as concentrating on the Skids the exhibition will feature some of Jobson’s own work outside of the band, as a writer and film maker.


“They’ve sort of put me at the heart of this exhibition, because they wanted to go beyond the band,” he said.


“So it’s not just The Skids and Big Country, the Trust was interested in some of the other work that I’ve been involved with because you should never just assume that people know what you’ve been doing.


“And the whole thing is building up to the release of a very short book about my time in The Skids and my early years in Fife. “It’s called ‘Into The Valley’ and comes out a couple of weeks after the exhibition opens.


“My first novel came out last week as well. It’s called ‘Speed Of Life’ about two aliens who come to Earth to search for David Bowie. So all these things are tied together. It’s a great way of celebrating the history of the band which was a pivotal moment in the history of Fife and for that area.”


Allied to the exhibition is a two-day convention centred around PJ Molloys, which will be an intimate affair.


“We wanted to play the whole Burning Cities album in an electric setting because we’ll probably never get a chance to do it again. Then the following day we’re going to be doing an acoustic session to launch my book.


“I’ve also got a little book called ‘No Bad Lyrics’ named after our record label, which prints all the lyrics with explanations at last for what I was going on about!


“We’re having a Skids gin bar in Dunfermline in my brother’s barber shop, and there’s the launch of the documentary which we made last year. Lots going on and it’s going to be great fun.”


For someone so firmly entrenched with Dunfermline it perhaps surprising to learn that Jobson hails from a different part of the Kingdom.


“I was born in Kirkcaldy. I always get associated with Dunfermline but actually as a kid I spent all my time in Kirkcaldy.


“So I’ve become an honorary son of Dunfermline but because of my formative years I had a great love for Kirkcaldy and still do.”

Speed of Life

Posted on April 11, 2018 at 2:10 PM Comments comments (0)


**We have now added a Richard Jobson Store to the site. Find this under the Store link at top of the page.**


Two time travelling Aliens arrive on Earth searching for the truth behind the words, music and changing faces of their hero David Bowie. In their quest for the meaning of human creativity through Bowies work they are exposed to a word of self-destruction and loneliness. London, Los Angelos, Berlin and New York show them the beauty and the horror of the modern world and introduces them to the human beings greatest quality, love.


Part Pop culture Sci-Fi thriller part love letter to David Bowie, The Speed of Life is a quiet meditation on the unreachable mystery and power of music.


****PLEASE NOTE UK DELIVERY ONLY****


**Signed copies available now in the Richard Jobson Store. Click here to buy now


Remembering Stuart on his 60th Birthday

Posted on April 11, 2018 at 2:00 PM Comments comments (1)


Into The Valley

Posted on March 27, 2018 at 2:25 PM Comments comments (0)



Publication date: 1st June 2018.

From school punk to modern day film producer Richard Jobson has lived a full and colourful life. A harrowing incident as a child that left him suffering with epilepsy but he was a mere 15 year old when he launched the punk rock band The Skids in 1977 with his songwriting partner Stuart Adamson.


He was allowed to go on tour on the condition that he received some education on the road. With hit singles including the immortal 'Into The Valley', after four albums The Skids folded and Jobson formed The Armoury Show whilst Adamson moved on to form his new band Big Country.


They remained friends and their relationship is explored in detail throughout. In the 1980s Jobson became a familiar face on television as a presenter and as film reviewer for Sky Television.


In June 2013, he was awarded an honorary degree (Doctor of Arts) from Edinburgh Napier University. Today he is a successful filmmaker and this part of his life story is also covered.


With a life that has gone full circle in 2017 he reactivated The Skids. A successful UK tour prompted demand for more shows in 2018 as well as the band's first new album for over three decades, making this the perfect time to write his memoirs.


Into The Valley is a riveting read of how one man overcame his disability to become successful in the world of music and film and will appeal particularly to fans of Punk Rock, The Skids and Big Country.


Format: Hardback


Size: 234 x 153mm


Pages: 224 (16 page photo section)


£19.99


CLICK HERE TO BUY


Get Ready Belfast and Dublin

Posted on March 20, 2018 at 1:30 PM Comments comments (0)


Skids Main Stage August 18th 2018

Posted on March 20, 2018 at 1:25 PM Comments comments (0)


BBC Radio2 Sound of the 70's

Posted on March 18, 2018 at 4:55 AM Comments comments (0)


Tune in to BBC Radio 2 today at 3.00pm today. Richard Jobson is live in the studio for Johnnie Walker's Sounds of the 70's


Click here to listen

It's no charade: Dunfermline to pay tribute to The Skids

Posted on March 17, 2018 at 4:10 PM Comments comments (0)




The music of seminal punk band The Skids will echo down the years in the musicians’ Dunfermline home town this year.


Dunfermline Carnegie Library and Galleries will showcase an exhibition celebrating the work and music of Richard Jobson and the Into the Valley stars from April 28 to August 26.


From 1977, the year that the influential group formed in Dunfermline, right up to the release of their first album in 35 years, the exhibition will include some unusual pieces of memorabilia, artwork and photographs.


The cultural hub holds a significant place for the band.


In the building’s former guise, a teenage Jobson would seek warmth to pen lyrics to some of The Skids’ earliest hits under the roof of the world’s first Carnegie Library.


Some of these original lyric sheets will be on display in the exhibition.


Jobson said: “I’m very proud of our roots here and want to be part of Dunfermline’s renaissance as the coolest town in Scotland – it’s really important that we all contribute to making the town a success and that it is seen by the rest of the country as a creative hub, a place where people make things happen.”


Jobson’s artwork Scared to Dance will also be displayed, along with footage from their gigs.


Jobson has spoken of The Skids being slightly different, as punk was an urban entity and the band came from the mining villages of Fife.


The Skids played their first gig on August 19 1977 at the Belleville Hotel in Pilmuir Street. Within six months they had released the Charles EP on the No Bad record label.


Guitarist and co-writer Stuart Adamson left the band after the recording of their third album The Absolute Game.


He went on to scale new heights as Big Country’s frontman, while The Skids continued on for one more LP release before calling it a day at their peak in 1982.


A series of talks and celebratory events will also be held, with music venue PJ Molloys promoting a Skids convention with social events, acoustic sessions and film screenings around the town.


The convention takes place at the end of Festival of Museums week on May 19 and 20.



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